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iandouglas

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Well up early this morning, out a run then sitting enjoying my brekkie whe a letter comes through my door. My local planning dept have had an 'enquiry' regarding my shed. Whilst I had planning permission, a condition was that the door did not cross the footpath. I have transgressed this by about 6". Anyway after a RANT to no-one in particular, I calmed down and called the planning dept. Unfortunately one of my 'neighbours' had sent in their concern re planning permission. they obviously would rather have this

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than this

002_zps1fa8d193.jpg

The shed is now all painted and the area tidied up, but obviously not good enough for the auld cnuts that live around here.

Looking at the first pic, that bush only leaves about 18" of the walkway, incidentally the rest of the bush at my neighbour fence is still there, whereas I have cleared all mine leaving a full footpath.

Anyway after calming down I spoke with the planning guy and I will need to rejig the door opening, either putting in a bifold, or sliding system.

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Ah geez. :shakeno: it's not like you'll leave the door open all the time. Or like you couldn't close it if someone came by FFS.

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Well up early this morning, out a run then sitting enjoying my brekkie whe a letter comes through my door. My local planning dept have had an 'enquiry' regarding my shed. Whilst I had planning permission, a condition was that the door did not cross the footpath. I have transgressed this by about 6". Anyway after a RANT to no-one in particular, I calmed down and called the planning dept. Unfortunately one of my 'neighbours' had sent in their concern re planning permission. they obviously would rather have this

004.jpg

than this

002_zps1fa8d193.jpg

The shed is now all painted and the area tidied up, but obviously not good enough for the auld cnuts that live around here.

Looking at the first pic, that bush only leaves about 18" of the walkway, incidentally the rest of the bush at my neighbour fence is still there, whereas I have cleared all mine leaving a full footpath.

Anyway after calming down I spoke with the planning guy and I will need to rejig the door opening, either putting in a bifold, or sliding system.

or open inwards. It will stop you putting stuff on the floor.

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Not a SHED but a useful place.

kpiu.jpg

xs6s.jpg

Double ended entrance.

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There was a girl I once knew who had a "double ended entrance" Sadly she married someone else!!!! :wank4az::rofl:

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Welcome back Ian, long time since we saw you on here

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wf - i'm giving the black diversion type bike to our son when he gets his a2, which i am sure he will, he'll take it on his insurance renewal in jan as mid term changes work out expensive

that leaves the three pre diversions which are older but i like them better being an old boy myself, i like two bikes running as if i have a puncture/breakdown i can rely on the other

the one at the bottom of the garden really is a source of spares, it cost £200 and has paid for itself already, you can get a working diversion for around £600 if you hunt about a bit

tommy - thanks, i got a bit depressed with losing my job back in april so didn't feel much like doing anything, fortunately, i feel a bit happier now, there really was no pleasing that boss :sigh2:

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Well, welcome back Ian! Sorry to hear you lost your job, but glad to see you're on the up again!

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As Bippo said Glad you're doing well again. Been there with the job thing, lost my job of 20 years, 6 years ago, I went self employed after that and have never looked back, best thing to happen to me as it turned out but was very down about it at the time.

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Welcome back Ian.

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thanks for remembering me/welcome

off to my mum's (she is 91) on my bike for a few days, she will either have a few jobs for me to do or it will be like an enforced rest, never know until i get there, if the latter and the weather is ok i'll see a bit of kent on the bike,

on a previous occasion i visited pevensey bay and saw the eastbourne pier fire, looked like something you see on the news (syria) from a distance. can't find a pevensey picture so here's another kent trip although taken at deal i think

25zpag9.jpg

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wrote a little item about sheds:-

Sad is the Shed Man - not

What could be nicer than your own shed? Of course it depends on circumstances but, hopefully, all of us will end up with our own shed at some point. In today's world, more than ever, you need a retreat, not exactly an escape, but your own space, surrounded by your own things, be that only stuff saved from the main house, knick-knacks and bits and pieces.

This will inevitably, for the likes of us, include large quantities of motorbike parts, or as your other half probably thinks of it, 'that useless rusty old scrap'. If you are indeed blessed, you could even have one shed as a chill out zone, and with another for actual storage. Once you've got one shed, you invariably need another, almost for its own sake, like another motorbike.

Shed life can have similarities with camping, and it doesn't hurt to have a camp stove and a kettle on hand but it's better than camping as there's the house, with its toilet and kitchen, just a few steps away. That garden path, linking the shed and the house is more than just a path; it's a bridge between peace and quiet on the one hand and the real world of relationships and responsibilities on the other. Separate, yet tantalisingly close at hand.

The downside is that sheds tend to be hot in summer and cold in winter. However, you can leave the door open when it is hot, and wear thermals when it's chilly. Mainly a day time thing, too, as hooking up power is such a hassle, plus bugs tend to be drawn by the light. A torch or lamp is really all you need for the occasional nocturnal rummage. Now, a radio. That's different. You'll definitely need a radio, battery or wind-up.

Maneuvering bikes in and out of your average garden-type shed can be a bit of conundrum, but where there's a will there's usually a way. A friend is carving out a new opening in one of his shed walls, but me, I just heave bikes around as best I can and normally manage it through the existing doorway.

I tend to use our shed more for storage than as a workshop as it is relatively confined. Also, for taking engines out the garage is better, as I can fix a hoist and use mains power as required. The shed is primarily for fiddling, mulling things over, cleaning and day dreaming. A quiet place surrounded by bike stuff, to contemplate rides, or go through boxes.

You know the problem. Your boss wants a document produced, and in a hurry, thank you very much. The office is noisy, and not really a place where you can assemble your thoughts easily. The shed is the ideal solution with its old basket chair, a discarded cushion that doesn't match the others in the living room, and a redundant waste bin for the false starts. The document got written, slowly to be sure, and with pauses for a stroll across the divide for a cup of tea or to use the bathroom, but it got done. Best thing I've written.

Once, hunting down spares, I ended up outside someone else's shed. It was full of used motorbike parts, with a couple of half-dismantled machines nearby for good measure. From where I was standing, looking in, I could see the legend, "I'm OK, they know me here", painted on one of the roof beams. At the time this seemed slightly odd, but now, in retrospect, I can understand and endorse the sentiment.

The shed is a personal plavce where interference is not expected, a friend was rebuilding an old motorbike, he had carefully placed all the engine parts in order pending the rebuild, some on nails tapped into the shed wall frame. Somehow, when children were playing in the garden, the shed took a blow or two. Small components ended up on the floor, out of order.

Sheds, bikes, dogs, wives and kids. They go together for a rounded life - you need the first three to be at your best with the last two. It's a yin and yang thing, two different but complementary worlds. Generally speaking, one dog, one wife and one set of kids will suffice, though. It's a pity that the dog hasn't take to the shed for some reason, but an old bike can be nearly as good for company.

A shed is so much more than four fairly insubstantial walls, a plank floor, and a flimsy roof. It's a hideaway, a private zone, somewhere with its own sense of mystery and promise. Am I mad to imagine these things? I don't think so. There's definitely something magical about escaping to a shed and, in my opinion, it's even better with a motorbike or two to share the space with. Icing on the cake, as it were.

You have to love your shed, and the restful world it represents, down there at the bottom of the garden.

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