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Strapping down a bike for Transporting

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heylo folks,

i have a rough idea of how to strap down a bike in a shipping crate and thought i'd double check by having a quick browse online but i get the impression that there are several views on the subject with no real clear definitive consensus.

anyway, thought i'd narrow it down and find out if you good people have a system you prefer or can advise on. havent had a bum steer in here with my endevours to get my bike back to the UK so far!

using a steel-framed skid which is forklift only (cant be suspended by straps) and i have plenty ratchet straps to spare.

steelframe-crate.jpg

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A difficult one this.

If I use a ferry, I tend to put it in gear, block the front wheel and single strap over the seat. If they go on a trailer it is chocked on the front wheel and they savagely tightened down by straps on the front to compress the forks and tied at the back to stop the rear swaying.

I would go the trailer route but be careful how much "welly" you give the front straps. Sometimes people seem to want to bottom the forks out or pop the fork seals. Can you get a front wheel chock? LINKY this will stop the wheel from wanting to turn left or right. It also allows the bike to stand upright without a stand. Then tied down at the front with ratchet straps until the front is compressed. One over the seat - use some padding on the seat so that the strap doesn't eat into the seat itself. Then a couple of straps at the back to stabilise the rear. Work front to back.

Straps are cheap, bodywork isn't.

Then the daily panic until you re open the crate.

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DT has some good ideas on this but have you thought of taking the wheels off and actually bolting it down? When you think about it that's how new bikes are transported in a crate so perhaps they know a thing or two about it, plus it takes up less room so you can make your crate smaller and that should cost less as long as it's not "by weight" costed. Just my thoughts on it. :jossun:

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Your bit supposed to strap down to compress the front forks it can damage the seals although I have done this myself without any problems.

Ken

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when ive taken bikes to the track i just wedged a block of wood or a brick on the front wheel and strapped it down one on each side hooking the hook on the left and right side of the handle bars and strapping it down tight, and also one over the seat and your all done :P

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Steel crates and forklifts... Me I would opt for a wooden frame if at all possible. Steel or plastic pallets on forks are a bugger as they just slide off.

Fork lift driver at a international pallet hub and it is a nightmare having to crawl to a stop to ensure the load don't keep going when we are busy.

Also if you can knock the bike down a bit into three chunks and put it on a euro you would saves a fortune as over sized loads are billed by the mm.

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On a boat from aus to here.

I would be getting a decent welder onside fully explain the issue then bracket to the MOST substantial mounts on the bike.

Engine mounts or some such. Swap out your bolts for longer to secure the bike solidly if needed to the pallet. An adittional bracket or plate to hold the front straight would be a good idea. Anything that moves can break.

Then there are no straps to slip or fret. No damage from removing wheels as that bike is a shaftie. Same with strapping the front. 6 to 8 weeks under full comp will do em no good.

Dont forget your bike could be experiencing atlantic storms. That doesent compare in any way to a trip on the m6 on a trailer.

Finally make the crate as secure as you can. Fellow had a land rover (early series1)imported and when it arrived it was missing its carb and throttle ass. Had a thank you note on the dash....

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indicators off

mirrors off

bike in gear

block front and rear wheels

strap from under seat around frame to ground

strap over top yolk to ground

pack sides with old duvets

good to go

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Do any of you folk appreciate what this bike may experience on the boat.

These boats dont sail round storms. They are too big. Secure it for worst case. There aint going to be anybody checking on it. If a strap fails a week in the bike could be smashed to buggery by the time it gets here.

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Do any of you folk appreciate what this bike may experience on the boat.

Cocktails at the Captains table, beautiful sunsets and the taste of salt in the air on the lips?

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Do any of you folk appreciate what you may experience on the boat.

a week in the boat and your ring could be smashed to buggery

Rum Bum and Baccy,,, :moon:

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Oooohh, so no general consensus in here either then :-)

Thanks for all the tips people.

The steel-framed skid came from the local Harley dealer. They don't make them themselves, so its pretty reliable :-)

My thinking there was if it can get a Road King at over 350kg to Australia then it should be more than enough for a VStar at under 260kg. There was also no need for chocs, the frame is supported by the 2 cross sections you can see in the pic and I have at least a dozen ratchet straps to hand. Bike will also be wrapped/surrounded by a fairly hardcore corrugated cardboard with some major overkill bubble-wrap which I suspect will make it more comfortable than I'll be on the plane.

I did get a shipping crate from a local Yamaha dealer which had no steel frame in the base and was made from what looks like recon-plywood (a recycled board made from wood & paper pulp that can snap if you look at it too hard)

crates.jpg

The strapping points on the bike is the remaining issue, especially around the forks & handlebars. Would be less stable unsupported, but strapping here could compress the forks.

At the risk of turning this into a spot the ball competition...

anchor-points.jpg

The plan thus far:

Loop around the rear wheel at point A. Straight overs with B, C, D, F. One strap per side for point H.

Looping around point G with one strap per side on the bars (E) currently debatable. Can't really remove the front wheel since I still need to get the bike picked up by a courier from port to Glasgow on the off chance they need to wheel the thing up a ramp into a van. Opinions of course welcomed and if anyone knows a reliable courier please let me know.

Less than 24hrs now until pickup time so if this lot doesn't get my wheels back to Glasgow in one piece then I'm putting it down to the conspiring of fates and an international plot by Yamaha so they can sell me another bike.

Grave(ly perplexed)

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Sounds like a plan.

One very obvious question...

Why did you not ask how they strap the hrdly wrthits down to get them there.

BDF look favourites to me to do the big work. With some timber under the bike so you only need to compress the suspention a small amount. You can really crank it down tight then without damage.

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One very obvious question...

Why did you not ask how they strap the hrdly wrthits down to get them there.

Ahhhh, you're obviously confusing me with someone who makes life easy for themselves.

I just bet you're the kind of bloke who would ask why I would pack away all my tools BEFORE remembering to change the oil, filters, pods & plugs?

i have 8 straps here so will go with all points but maybe keep EFG on a low tension.

tried the bike in earlier today and was pretty impressed. very snug and could stand up on its own once the front wheel was i its cradle.

well, pickup team should be here in about 6 or 7hrs so i'm off into the garage for some quality time before they get here.

Grave(ly anxious)

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Do any of you folk appreciate what this bike may experience on the boat.

Somali Pirates?

Grave(ly immature)

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Somali Pirates?

Grave(ly immature)

haha they're a pushover up against glasweigens haha

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haha they're a pushover up against glasweigens haha

Mair chance o" the pirates buying you a drink on board,,,, :buzz:

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Mair chance o" the pirates buying you a drink on board,,,, :buzz:

I'll have you know I once offered to buy a man a drink. Was in 1992, but it still counts!

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Ladies, Gentlemen and Hibs fans :-)

Securer than a really secure thing thats just been checked over for secureness by a security guard...

2013-05-07+09.56.48.jpg

2013-05-07+09.56.56.jpg

Don't always believe what you read on a label kids...

2013-05-07+11.25.25.jpg

I did have a giggle at the "DO NOT DROP" line on the box. That was until I met the guy who came to pick it up today and now I realise it is fully justified.

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Good luck mate, may we see you on a road somewhere soon

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