Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Late Starter

Genral maintenance

Recommended Posts

No, not in Cheshire, think you are thinking of someone else..! I will update my profile, I am in Stamford, Lincs...

Hmmm, not many members out that way, not big posters anyway. A lot of the folks on here are "ooooop narth lad".

I'm a bit too far away in Northants. Go past every day in the truck but the boss would object, that overactive plod on his pushbike would prob get the hump too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm, not many members out that way, not big posters anyway. A lot of the folks on here are "ooooop narth lad".

I'm a bit too far away in Northants. Go past every day in the truck but the boss would object, that overactive plod on his pushbike would prob get the hump too.

Thats a shame, never mind - I'll have a read of the user manual later and see how easy it is to follow for someone that has no idea!! Where in Northants are you? My dad lives in Kettering. Who do you drive for, I will keep a look out for your truck and give you a wave - you'll wonder who the hell is waving at you! lol :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thats a shame, never mind - I'll have a read of the user manual later and see how easy it is to follow for someone that has no idea!! Where in Northants are you? My dad lives in Kettering. Who do you drive for, I will keep a look out for your truck and give you a wave - you'll wonder who the hell is waving at you! lol :D

I'm in Bugbrooke, just west of Northants. Most people just respond with HUH so i stick with Northampton :lol:

Was Christian Salvesen, then we got swallowed whole by the big red monster that is Norbert.

There is a lot of good advice on here if you get a handle on the search function. Must be over 3 characters so don't search 'SR 125', say. Type 'SR125' with chain adjusting, whatever. Point is use a bit of savey and a little patience to sort through the replies and there is buckets of info.

Obviously any questions you have hollar, but it really is worth reading the manual through, esp the maintanance section and letting it sink in. Then just tackle the smaller jobs first like adjusting the chain to build your confidence and your tool kit.

A reasonably priced tool kit (cheap tools will cost you a fortune) will get most jobs done. 8,10,11,12,13,14mm spanners an adjustable spanner, a socket set and some allen keys will cover 90% of maintanance. Plus obviously some cans of squirt (wd40/plussgas) too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in Bugbrooke, just west of Northants. Most people just respond with HUH so i stick with Northampton :lol:

Was Christian Salvesen, then we got swallowed whole by the big red monster that is Norbert.

There is a lot of good advice on here if you get a handle on the search function. Must be over 3 characters so don't search 'SR 125', say. Type 'SR125' with chain adjusting, whatever. Point is use a bit of savey and a little patience to sort through the replies and there is buckets of info.

Obviously any questions you have hollar, but it really is worth reading the manual through, esp the maintanance section and letting it sink in. Then just tackle the smaller jobs first like adjusting the chain to build your confidence and your tool kit.

A reasonably priced tool kit (cheap tools will cost you a fortune) will get most jobs done. 8,10,11,12,13,14mm spanners an adjustable spanner, a socket set and some allen keys will cover 90% of maintanance. Plus obviously some cans of squirt (wd40/plussgas) too.

Thanks for the tips, I have already been having a look around using the search function with some success. The only trouble is that not many people post photos of how they do things! lol I was thinking of getting hold of some second hand tools from ebay to start off with - as long as they do the job I don't mind how shiney they are! I will take all thats been said onboard and will have a bash at doing some basic stuff using the forum and the manual. B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A reasonably priced tool kit (cheap tools will cost you a fortune) will get most jobs done. 8,10,11,12,13,14mm spanners an adjustable spanner, a socket set and some allen keys will cover 90% of maintanance. Plus obviously some cans of squirt (wd40/plussgas) too.

Dunna' forget to add a big bloody hammer to your tool kit either, as attacking your bike when things go pear shaped, and you need to take your frustration out on your bike, just isn't the same with a 10mm combination spanner :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

getting and doing is the best way to learn. you'll never get the bike fixed chatting to this lot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have no qualms (is that really a word) about taking them off and re-using them :rolleyes:

But to take the chain off to oil it is madness :blink:

Spring clips can be re-used provided there not mangled while being removed.

Take the chain off to clean it, its the best way of washing the grit and shite out from between the pins and rollers

At the end of the day, its about how clean a chain you want. If you spend a few hours cleaning and polishing, you may as well have the chain off rather than re-oil on top of shite

As someone said earlier, its a can of worms

Each to his own :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to add my two cents...

I know it's already been pointed out but getting a Haynes manual has gotta be a good investment whatever level you are. If you're gonna have the bike a couple months or more I'd say definitely get it. I started as a total novice after passing my CBT a few weeks ago. Since then I can use the manual to check off all the little jobs the previous owner of my bike didn't do, and like has been said, the more you tinker the more you get to know the bike. I'm still a noob but I've already got my first oil change, fork oil seal change, battery test and replacement, throttle body removed and cleaned (as well as drilling out and replacing the nightmare jammed air screw in there) and chain tensioner adjustment under my belt. BTW I just use a nylon washing up brush with some green gunk to clean the chain in situ, rinse, dry, then lube with my bottle of scottoil every week.

There's loads of helpful people around these forums, but I'd say you can't beat having a straigtforward manual by your side when tackling any job so you can answer those niggling little questions right off instead of having to boot up your cpu and cover your keyboard in grease.

And no, I don't work for Haynes, just think they're worth the dough ;)

Happy riding!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Holy crap !

I was having palputations reading this thread,

Until I came to this ->

Er, lots of advice above, but, er, suppose i better say it, um, er.....scottoiler?

I fitted a scottoiler for the first time 12 years ago...... On the bikes i've had it fitted to i have wiped the crud off while washing the bike and...........

thats it, and i get 20k+ from my bike chains they stretch past their limit rather than wear out. There is a bit of splatter till you get it set right but that shows the chain is oiled AFAIC.

Also boring detail, WD40 and parafin can damage rubber and some synthetics, how many times do you see suitable for 'o' ring chains on lube, those little 'o' rings are delicate (ironicly) the wrong lube can either make them swell, or just as bad, crack. You may well be destroying them washing them in parifin and wd.

Scottoiler, this is THE best investment in a chain set. My Tenere has covered 25k miles on it's original chainset, and it is about 1/3 of the way through it's adjustment. Once or twice a year (usually in the winter), or after an expedition, I give the chain a clean with some chain cleaner or some parafin. I use a brush and clean the sides only, then rinse with plain cold water and lube up with a nice sticky spray to prime the chain.

Modern chains don't need lubrication to work, they need lubrication to stop them corroding and to clear the crap off them and protect the O or X rings. So the only way to ensure this is done correctly is to have fresh oil on them, and to get flung off, constantly. The reason they do not need lubrication is becasue they are greased between the O or X rings, using some cleaning products will bugger the rubber, or seep through, and dilute the grease. When the grease goes the chain follows very shortly after.

WD40 is a Water Displacement product, it is also a very efficient degreaser. Parrafin is a very efficient degreaser too, so either of these products should be used with caution, and never soak or leave them on the chain. Make sure they are washed from the chain as soon as possible and the correct lubricant used.

Dry products are OK and many swear by thier use is dusty conditions, such as desert or dry trail. Personally I turn the Scottoiler up a couple of notches which work, but does cover your bike in oily crud. Racers will sometimes remove all oil from their chains to prolong the chain life in dry dusty/desert conditions too.

Chainsaw oil is a good substitue for chain oil, but it doesn't stick very well. It works on the same priciple as a scottoiler (hense the oil tank on a chainsaw0, in that it constantly washes the chain free of sap.

If you are using chain oil then yoy should be applying oil ever 150 - 200 miles, which a is a PITA at best, especially when you have a tank range of 300miles! So as I said earlier, and Cynic pointed out Scottoiler is the only way to go.

I'll climb back in my box for another 3 months now......

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Who's Online (See full list)

    There are no registered users currently online

  • Recently Browsing

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...