Jump to content

Vstar 1300 valve adjustment


ChrisG
 Share

Recommended Posts

Just bought my 07 Vstar 1300 and am approaching the first valve adjutment interval. The Yamaha maintenance manual states that you have to drain engine coolant, remove throttle bodies, intake manifold assemblies, thermostat inlet hoses etc. Has anyone done a valve adjustment on this bike? Is all this draining and removal really necessary? Thanks for your input.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just bought my 07 Vstar 1300 and am approaching the first valve adjutment interval. The Yamaha maintenance manual states that you have to drain engine coolant, remove throttle bodies, intake manifold assemblies, thermostat inlet hoses etc. Has anyone done a valve adjustment on this bike? Is all this draining and removal really necessary? Thanks for your input.

Yes you do have to drain the engine coolant. The valve on the front intake cylnder is cover by coolant hoses. I could not find a way to get to it without draining it and did not want to chance having coolant drip into my engine if you can let me know. :unsure:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes you do have to drain the engine coolant. The valve on the front intake cylnder is cover by coolant hoses. I could not find a way to get to it without draining it and did not want to chance having coolant drip into my engine if you can let me know. :unsure:

Thanks for your help. I was hoping this was not necessary, but such is life. Did you also have to remove the throttle bodies?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for your help. I was hoping this was not necessary, but such is life. Did you also have to remove the throttle bodies?

No that part I skipped that I took off the Air cleaner filter and left it at that. I did the radiator by the book but I think next time there must be a easier way to drain the fluid off or at least enough to take the top hoses off. And no I did not have to take the air cleaner off but I wanted to keep it from getting scratched up and only 4 screws.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did the 600 mile valve service about 2800 miles ago. Did NOT remove hoses OR throttle bodies. Never opened the radiator.

A long screwdriver will pry the top hose aside just enough to access the valves.

It was still a very lengthy process, and one of the most difficult parts was reattaching the forward vent hoses under the tank. It took another set of hands for me to accomplish that feat without scratching anything.

I hope round two will go more quickly. It's coming up soon.

Good luck.

Renfield.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I did the 600 mile valve service about 2800 miles ago. Did NOT remove hoses OR throttle bodies. Never opened the radiator.

A long screwdriver will pry the top hose aside just enough to access the valves.

It was still a very lengthy process, and one of the most difficult parts was reattaching the forward vent hoses under the tank. It took another set of hands for me to accomplish that feat without scratching anything.

I hope round two will go more quickly. It's coming up soon.

Good luck.

Renfield.

You truly get the guts award for that. I tried the screw driver thing but did not want to put that much presure on my 600 mile bike. As far as the vent hoses went I have a couple of 4 inch scrap wood wedges that slide under the left side of the tank. I can then get under the tank enough that it goes right on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

You truly get the guts award for that. I tried the screw driver thing but did not want to put that much presure on my 600 mile bike. As far as the vent hoses went I have a couple of 4 inch scrap wood wedges that slide under the left side of the tank. I can then get under the tank enough that it goes right on.

Thanks for the award nomination, I guess. Too often stupid and gutsy are interchangeable. :D

Anyhow no guts, no glory right?

I performed the second valve job last Sunday at 4,500 miles. Took roughly half as long as the first effort. Only removed seat, tank, plastichrome covers, plugs, and of course the engine trim panel that reveals the timing marks.

Didn't even remove the aircleaner, but I did take off the throttle cables at the throttle body. It helps having a sawed off 5mm hex wrench when removing the valve cover on the front jug intake (the one under the coolant hose). ;)

All in all, a bit cramped but perfectly doable. With a minimum of hassle compared to the shop manual prescribed method. Even with twice the valve count, it was an easier job than on my old 650 Classic. And your scrap wood idea worked well for reconnecting the vent hoses under tank.

Throttle body sync was still spot on - no adjustment necessary.

Cheers,

Renfield

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sounds good Im still deceiding on my next adjustment how far I want to tear it down. I think that it will make it till the snow hits so I can take my time. The hex wrench idea sounds good though Im going to do that. Im kind of the extra wood guy myself just 4 2x6 screwed them ontop of each other about 8 inches long. I them put two scrap pieces on top where thiers enough room to trap mty kickstand in the middle. Works great for oil changes and checking the level. No need to get anyones help or worry about dropping her. It works well for me anyway.

;) Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To tell you the truth I have no idea anymore.I have heard that the ones sold in england are adjusted first at 12,000 miles per the manufacture. In Aust its 20,000 km or 12,000 miles I have no idea why here the first one is at 600 miles.I have already done mine and most likely would do it again if I bought a new one. My bike was in specs on the 600 mile service but doing it yourself does not cost anything. Just the having the piece of mind is worth it to me. I started doing my own when I had a Kaw Concourse and after getting the first 2 services done someone told me the dealer does not even check them where he worked at unless they had a problem or over 8,000 miles. So I started doing it myself so I know its done and all it cost me is a few hours time. I have always gone by factory specs and would never advise anyone any different so even in this situation to me its better safe than sorry.

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...

To tell you the truth I have no idea anymore.I have heard that the ones sold in england are adjusted first at 12,000 miles per the manufacture. In Aust its 20,000 km or 12,000 miles I have no idea why here the first one is at 600 miles.I have already done mine and most likely would do it again if I bought a new one. My bike was in specs on the 600 mile service but doing it yourself does not cost anything. Just the having the piece of mind is worth it to me. I started doing my own when I had a Kaw Concourse and after getting the first 2 services done someone told me the dealer does not even check them where he worked at unless they had a problem or over 8,000 miles. So I started doing it myself so I know its done and all it cost me is a few hours time. I have always gone by factory specs and would never advise anyone any different so even in this situation to me its better safe than sorry.

Jerry

Rooster, I am new to this bike, Just bought and brought it home 5-31-2008. What maunal do you use for the teardown and adjustment of the valves? The question is, why is it necessary to adjust valves on a bike that has hydraulic valves?

I also live in KC, my 1300 is the cnady apple red tourer model. I have been out of riding for about 20 years, the last bike I had was a yamaha XS1100 special (driveshaft model) it seemd to have a prblem with creeping when at a stop. I have not noticed that with this big bike.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi all! I also just bought my v star 1300 a couple of weeks ago and already have over 1000 miles on her. I did the oil change at 600 miles, and am waiting of the dealership to get my factory manual to me. I plan on doing as much work on this bike as I Have always done in the past to all of my bikes. ?It sounds like adjusting the valves is quite an ordeal. I'm sure that after you have done it a time or 2 it wouldn't be to bad. So far, I REALLY LIKE THIS BIKE!!!!!!I can't wait to get the manual, so that i can start reading up on the "corrrect way" of doing things. Thanks, ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 years later...

To tell you the truth I have no idea anymore.I have heard that the ones sold in england are adjusted first at 12,000 miles per the manufacture. In Aust its 20,000 km or 12,000 miles I have no idea why here the first one is at 600 miles.I have already done mine and most likely would do it again if I bought a new one. My bike was in specs on the 600 mile service but doing it yourself does not cost anything. Just the having the piece of mind is worth it to me. I started doing my own when I had a Kaw Concourse and after getting the first 2 services done someone told me the dealer does not even check them where he worked at unless they had a problem or over 8,000 miles. So I started doing it myself so I know its done and all it cost me is a few hours time. I have always gone by factory specs and would never advise anyone any different so even in this situation to me its better safe than sorry.

Jerry

I know this is an old post, however I can confirm that the XVS 1300 sold here in the UK have their valve checks at 12000 mile intervals. I have one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...