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Neutral from 2nd gear? New rider question...


streeto
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Hi all.

I’m new to manual bikes (total riding time = CBT + 1 hour!) and have a Yamaha YBR 125…

I have noticed that if I put my bike into neutral from second gear, I then struggle to engage first again.

If however I put the bike in neutral from first gear then I never have a problem getting back in to first.

I’m new to this - is it me or the bike? Should I avoid going from second to neutral, and instead go all the way down to first and then back up to neutral?

Thanks.

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Try going into Neutral (I assume you're stationary?), letting the clutch out, maybe revving it a little and then engaging First.

Technically though, you should never really need to go fron Second to Neutral. You should go down the gears one at a time.

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Try going into Neutral (I assume you're stationary?), letting the clutch out, maybe revving it a little and then engaging First.

we have lots of posts from people having difficulty with the gear changing on these bikes, try the above, its worthwhile to pull in and let out the clutch a few times, see if this works for you.

Technically though, you should never really need to go fron Second to Neutral. You should go down the gears one at a time.

I go from second to neutral all the time, on any bike ;)

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Try going into Neutral (I assume you're stationary?), letting the clutch out, maybe revving it a little and then engaging First.

Technically though, you should never really need to go fron Second to Neutral. You should go down the gears one at a time.

Why shouldn't you go from 2nd into neutral? It's a perfectly legitimate action when coming to a halt. Going from any other gear to neutral seems bizarre to me. In fact that's why neutral is where it is, next to 2nd and not below 1st.

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Why shouldn't you go from 2nd into neutral? It's a perfectly legitimate action when coming to a halt.

I said 'technically'.

CBT teaches you to go down through the gears, stopping in 1st and keeping the clutch held in.

The idea is you shift down and let out the clutch for that all-important engine braking, except during an emergency stop.

You can go down from 2nd to Neutral - I do it myself sometimes, usually just before flipping the sidestand down and plonking the bike down as it stops, pushing off with the left foot and spinning round into a standing position next to the bike, all in one fluid motion.

However, this is Advanced Cruiser Posing and not recommended for beginners or those with tall bikes :lol:

So yes, you can do it, but there's no reason where you actually need to.

Also, like smoking (which is something else I do to excess), it's not something I actively advocate in other people.

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I said 'technically'.

CBT teaches you to go down through the gears, stopping in 1st and keeping the clutch held in.

The idea is you shift down and let out the clutch for that all-important engine braking, except during an emergency stop.

You can go down from 2nd to Neutral - I do it myself sometimes, usually just before flipping the sidestand down and plonking the bike down as it stops, pushing off with the left foot and spinning round into a standing position next to the bike, all in one fluid motion.

However, this is Advanced Cruiser Posing and not recommended for beginners or those with tall bikes :lol:

So yes, you can do it, but there's no reason where you actually need to.

Also, like smoking (which is something else I do to excess), it's not something I actively advocate in other people.

Thanks for clarifying that, I had no idea that people were actually taught to move down through the gears as far as first but if that's the case I've learned something. To me first is a gear for starting off only, I never downshift to first but I guess I can see some sense in going down to first with the clutch in rather than going into neutral. If it works then fine, I maybe try it.

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Thanks for clarifying that, I had no idea that people were actually taught to move down through the gears as far as first but if that's the case I've learned something. To me first is a gear for starting off only, I never downshift to first but I guess I can see some sense in going down to first with the clutch in rather than going into neutral. If it works then fine, I maybe try it.

What??

Did ye not do CBT, then?

Jeezy, we got it all the way through DAS and everything.

When stopping on the road, at lights or whatever, you should 'technically' shift down through each gear separately, letting the clutch out each time for engine braking and cooming to a controlled stop in first. Apparently you can tell a poor rider by the fact that they stop and then shift down.

It's good practice because it means you get the full braking effect (a bike has three brakes, remember) plus you will have executed the stop with enough time to downshift properly and correctly.

You should then be standing still in 1st, clutch in, rear brake on and left foot only on the ground.

Course in practice, I usually slow right down, maybe downshifting if I need extra braking, drag the clutch in as the revs hit the floor and shift down to 1st just before I come to a stop.

I might then shift into neutral, fiddle with the engine, check my reflection in the mirror, dance the YMCA or whatever.

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What??

Did ye not do CBT, then?

............................

errrr, no I didn't do my CBT. I passed my bike test in 1975.

I agree about downshifting of course but it would never ever occur to me to downshift into first when moving. Only go down to second, stop, neutral. Only use first for pulling away. As I said that's why neutral is positioned where it is between first and second so you can get to it directly from second when stopping and you can go directly from it into first when starting off again. It needs to be accessible from both.

If the method advised now is 6-5-4-3-2-1-neutral I wonder why they don't build gearboxes to enable that and move neutral "below" first. They didn't place it where it is just on a whim, there was a very compelling reason.

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errrr, no I didn't do my CBT. I passed my bike test in 1975.

Man, I wasn't even born then :D

If the method advised now is 6-5-4-3-2-1-neutral I wonder why they don't build gearboxes to enable that and move neutral "below" first.

Some bikes do, especially smaller single cylinder ones.

Remember the old Honda M50 Monkeybikes?

They do exactly that, although they only have 4 gears.

Jing Chen now make copies of 'em.

TBH, it's up to you how you ride.

My box doesn't especially like going into N from 2nd and it takes a very delicate touch to knock it in.

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Man, I wasn't even born then :D

Some bikes do, especially smaller single cylinder ones.

Remember the old Honda M50 Monkeybikes?

They do exactly that, although they only have 4 gears.

Jing Chen now make copies of 'em.

TBH, it's up to you how you ride.

My box doesn't especially like going into N from 2nd and it takes a very delicate touch to knock it in.

Your points are perfectly valid. I am quite happy to accept that I am out of touch with quite a lot of stuff as much has changed since I started, probably for the better. Although I did say that neutral is between first and second, on my Ducati there's loads of neutrals but not where I expect them. The one between fourth and fifth can be embarrassing!

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If I remember correctly my YB100 was N-1-2-3-4 - can't remember now whether it was up or down.....anyway, I tend to work my way down the gears, partly 'cos sometimes the gearbox feels sticky and unless I come to a stop in 2nd or 1st it won't shift down to first unless I let the clutch out a little....and then stall it....and then look a prat.

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Hi all.

I’m new to manual bikes (total riding time = CBT + 1 hour!) and have a Yamaha YBR 125…

I have noticed that if I put my bike into neutral from second gear, I then struggle to engage first again.

If however I put the bike in neutral from first gear then I never have a problem getting back in to first.

I’m new to this - is it me or the bike? Should I avoid going from second to neutral, and instead go all the way down to first and then back up to neutral?

Thanks.

Geday mate, I ride bikes all day for a living and almost every weekend for fun and I hope my views on this topic help. Try and get in the habit of always down shifting to first when coming to a stop. Not only will it prevent you from having the drama you described but it is also a defensive riding technique. Should you commute often enough, you will eventually be put in a position where you need to move away from the stopped position as quickly as possible.

For example, a car reversing from a driveway that has not seen you or a car locking it up behind you and you needing to move away quickly. In both instances finding a cog and then moving on is way too slow. In my opinion always keeping these possible scenarios in mind,is the only way that you can commute year in,year out and not get bowled over. Another defensive technique relates to gear position whilst commuting. It is advisable to always commute in a gear relative to the speed of the vehicles around you. This way should you need to accelerate away to avoid a collision you are not wasting time finding the appropriate cog. I always try to ride in a gear where one quick shift down will put me in a very responsive range. You will be surprised how many speeding fines it may also prevent especially when you step up to big bikes. In the higher gears it is easy to be cruising along at a higher than intended speed without noticing. HAVE A BLAST! Paul.

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Try and get in the habit of always down shifting to first when coming to a stop. Not only will it prevent you from having the drama you described but it is also a defensive riding technique. Should you commute often enough, you will eventually be put in a position where you need to move away from the stopped position as quickly as possible.

+1

@streeto:

I have over 16.000 KM in nearly two years with my YBR125. I've never had a systematic gear problem as those described in many threads. Only when my foot doesn't do a foul moovement I do have a "gear problem".

It's always handy to quick twist the throtle a bit when downsifting.

Another thing is to have your clutch sluck regulated and whatever you do, don't put oil "thiner" than recomended.

Try these and you'll see.

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  • 2 years later...

Hi there,

I know this is an old topic but I was just browsing through the forums and thought I could add my two cents for any new readers. I printed of the owner's manual for the YBR this afternoon, and it states in there that the procedure for shifting to neutral should always be all the way down to first and then your small nudge back up to neutral.

Cheers

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