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Badgerofmight

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About Badgerofmight

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  • Birthday October 23

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  • Current Bike(s)
    Yamaha YBR 125 '07

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  1. I wanted to link to a reply I made on another thread that is relevant here, but I don't know how, so I'll just copy and past it below: This is the bane of ybr owners everywhere. I had been having identical problems that kept getting worse until it didnt matter what temperature it was. Finally gave in and took it to a garage of bike enthusiasts. Even took them a couple of weeks to decide but in the end I coughed up the £250 for a new fuel pump! (you can buy a new friggin engine for that, but I could not find the part ANYWHERE but the main dealer. Touch wood, the problem seems to have gone, but I still worry. The pump had been ceasing up, and the heat was making it worse, so it didnt seem to be anything to do with tank pressure or anything like that. The guys who looked at the bike said they had no idea why injection would be fitted to a 125, let alone any other bike. Their opinion seemed to be avoid injection if you can, it's just an uneccessary thing to go wrong. On top of that, they were speaking with a guy from the local yam dealer and judging by the frame number stamp they reckon the bike is made largely in china under license from yamaha!? Either I have one unlucky lemon (its a 2007 ybr ED by the way) or this is a dissapointing venture from yamaha. I went for the yam to avaoid cheap chinese parts! Whatever, that's my two cents. The pump is a widespread problem that a lot of yam dealers aren't ready to admit if you ask them, although I concede that replacing it for Bane77 was good under warranty, my warranty is long past. It makes me wonder why they wouldnt acknowledge the problem though as it meant extra money for the dealers.
  2. This is the bane of ybr owners everywhere. I had been having identical problems that kept getting worse until it didnt matter what temperature it was. Finally gave in and took it to a garage of bike enthusiasts. Even took them a couple of weeks to decide but in the end I coughed up the £250 for a new fuel pump! (you can buy a new friggin engine for that, but I could not find the part ANYWHERE but the main dealer. Touch wood, the problem seems to have gone, but I still worry. The pump had been ceasing up, and the heat was making it worse, so it didnt seem to be anything to do with tank pressure or anything like that. The guys who looked at the bike said they had no idea why injection would be fitted to a 125, let alone any other bike. Their opinion seemed to be avoid injection if you can, it's just an uneccessary thing to go wrong. On top of that, they were speaking with a guy from the local yam dealer and judging by the frame number stamp they reckon the bike is made largely in china under license from yamaha!? Either I have one unlucky lemon (its a 2007 ybr ED by the way) or this is a dissapointing venture from yamaha. I went for the yam to avaoid cheap chinese parts! Whatever, that's my two cents. The pump is a widespread problem that a lot of yam dealers aren't ready to admit if you ask them, although I concede that replacing it for Bane77 was good under warranty, my warranty is long past. It makes me wonder why they wouldnt acknowledge the problem though as it meant extra money for the dealers.
  3. I did this a couple of months back with the help of the future father in law, who is a seasoned engineer. Even so, it was still a looong job. It's not the difficult in itself, you'll just come up against little problems as you go through like the point where you ideally need the T70. I would definitely recommend getting all the right tools. I didnt have the T70 and we were shoving all sorts down the tube to get some purchase. Also tried to do it without a seal hook. Reckoned a screwdriver and a bit of care would do but the inside of the tube got scored. We smoothed it off and it has seemed ok for the past few months but I know its there and I wish it wasnt. As for the actual seal I just went to the local yam dealer. They love me there cos I constantly piss money into their pockets, but at least I was sure of the size and fit wich is one less worry
  4. Awesome, I have this problem too, thanks for the info
  5. Hi dblane, You're right, many others including me have this problem but I too struggle to find anything more definitive than changing the fuel pump. Mine doesn't even cool down in less then a few hours rather than minutes. Also, I tried to start it today in overcast weather which is usually my friend, but now high humidity causes the same problem. When I ask at the local Yam garage they say they never heard of anyone having this problem (really?!). Many answers seem to point to the engine temp sensor or air intake temp sensor believing it's too hot and choking the mixture. So I have an open to question to you if you find anything more out, or to anyone else who has any insight. a) Is the air intake sensor the little plastic LED sized thing that protrudes into the throttle body (looking inside the actual body after removal)? b)Where would the component be that stops the fuel pump working? c) Can I identify any wires/units that control the fuel pump and somehow override the ECU control so force it to start working whatever the weather? d) Why the hell didn't I just get a year older model with a carb and not injection? Cheers to anyone who can offer any help, it would be greatly appreciated. I know there are a lot of posts on this issue, but all the more reason to get some definite answers on it so the forums don't get clogged with repetetive questions hey?
  6. Just to add my two cents... I know it's already been pointed out but getting a Haynes manual has gotta be a good investment whatever level you are. If you're gonna have the bike a couple months or more I'd say definitely get it. I started as a total novice after passing my CBT a few weeks ago. Since then I can use the manual to check off all the little jobs the previous owner of my bike didn't do, and like has been said, the more you tinker the more you get to know the bike. I'm still a noob but I've already got my first oil change, fork oil seal change, battery test and replacement, throttle body removed and cleaned (as well as drilling out and replacing the nightmare jammed air screw in there) and chain tensioner adjustment under my belt. BTW I just use a nylon washing up brush with some green gunk to clean the chain in situ, rinse, dry, then lube with my bottle of scottoil every week. There's loads of helpful people around these forums, but I'd say you can't beat having a straigtforward manual by your side when tackling any job so you can answer those niggling little questions right off instead of having to boot up your cpu and cover your keyboard in grease. And no, I don't work for Haynes, just think they're worth the dough Happy riding!
  7. I would also add that I'd heartily recomended buying the Haynes manual for the ybr (it's the orange one, and also covers some XT models too I think). It gives you step by step guidance on testing wiring for a multitude of components if you have the necessary multimeter.
  8. The one i removed from mine when I changed the oil is 22mm in diameter, and the inner hole is 12mm in diameter. I also have a pdf of the parts manual for the YBR which may help you if you order parts from your dealer or something. IF you want I can email it to you. Thanks are in order for the person who originally linked the manual in their post, but unfortunately I cant remember who it was now
  9. I'd definitely reccomend the cleaning and lube option, although that particular screw is in a ball-ache place to get in with brushes or see what you're doing. I began with the rather laborious method of using a small length of hacksaw blade in some mole grips and trying to saw a new groove for a flathead screwy. After way too much time a did manage the cut but it still wasn't for budging so a mate just drilled it out for me. Drilled out some of the thread though, but luckily there's still enough to hold my new bolt. Since then I've discovered the starter motor bolt in exactly the same condition, but this time the exhaust is in the way of getting any useful tools in Oh, and the idle adjuster screw is also jammed and a little chewed from trying to crack it! From now on, no matter how small the job, I reckon I'm gonna just lube any potential jammed screws (seemingly every one on the bike) over and over again for a day or so before attempting to loosen them!
  10. Thanks for the input guys. The gimmick-ness of redex seems to be true, the two ingredients stated on the bottle are just petroleum variants. Like you say though, I figured it couldn't do any harm. All that made me think twice was one forum poster claimed he used fuel cleaner then his engine was tapping and knocking. Someone did reply though, saying the carbon deposits were probably holding his seals etc together, and when that was cleaned out they fell to bits!
  11. Italian tune up is how I've seen other people refer to giving it the nuts for a mile or so to give the engine a good clean out
  12. Sounds interesting, keep us posted!
  13. Hi all, I'm currently going through a step by step service of my recently aquired 2007 ybr 125 (the injection odel) with 19,000 on the clock. I suspect the previous owner didn't even know the word maintenance as the air filter was flooded with a rancid gunk that must have been there ages. A friend recommended that before I do an oil change, I put some in-fuel cleaner through the bike. I have a bottle of redex petrol injector fuel system cleaner which says dump the whole bottle in the tank but I assume this is a guide for cars not bikes. So I gues my queries are: 1/ Will Redex do any good for may bike, and if not, will it actually do any harm? Some posters on the net seem to think it will. 2/ If I do use it, what is the correct dilution? I have a 12.5 litre tank. Does anyone else use cleaners, or just use the 'itlaian tune up'? Any thoughts or pointers would be greatly appreciated Cheers
  14. Thanks for the pointers guys. I've ended up with a litre of gunk (the green tree hugging suff). The tougher grime takes a couple of applications and a bit of scrubbing but I can't expect it to do all the work, otherwise it does the trick. £7 from Halfords, and my zippo came up a treat too!
  15. I have a less than perfect 07 YBR, but on occaision I heard a squeaky sound from the back. Turned out that the (once shiny) metal fairing bit on the exhaust was creaking if I gave it a wiggle, or indeed if the thumping engine gave it a wiggle. You never know, it might just be that!
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